Oxford Technical OXTS Inertial+2 GPS Inertial/GNSS Measurement Navigation System
Oxford Technical OXTS Inertial+2 GPS Inertial/GNSS Measurement Navigation SystemOxford Technical OXTS Inertial+2 GPS Inertial/GNSS Measurement Navigation SystemOxford Technical OXTS Inertial+2 GPS Inertial/GNSS Measurement Navigation SystemOxford Technical OXTS Inertial+2 GPS Inertial/GNSS Measurement Navigation SystemOxford Technical OXTS Inertial+2 GPS Inertial/GNSS Measurement Navigation SystemOxford Technical OXTS Inertial+2 GPS Inertial/GNSS Measurement Navigation SystemOxford Technical OXTS Inertial+2 GPS Inertial/GNSS Measurement Navigation SystemOxford Technical OXTS Inertial+2 GPS Inertial/GNSS Measurement Navigation SystemOxford Technical OXTS Inertial+2 GPS Inertial/GNSS Measurement Navigation SystemOxford Technical OXTS Inertial+2 GPS Inertial/GNSS Measurement Navigation System
$6,230.00
Clean and in excellent condition. These were removed from a prominent DOE facility during upgrade. GPS, IMU sensors and PC connection (NAVsuite configuration utility) tested onsite without issue. 

Comes as shown with main unit, 2x antennas w/ cables, case and 12v connector. We can wire the connection for either the included 12V car adapter or a 120v AC power supply. Please state preference when ordering. 

Hassle Free Warranty. 




Manufacturer Description

The Inertial+ is an add-on for GNSS receivers to improve reliability and accuracy. The
Inertial+ uses accelerometers and angular rate sensors (gyros) to smooth the jumps in
GNSS and fill in missing data. Other important measurements, such as heading, pitch
and roll, can also be measured.

The Inertial+ is a true inertial navigation system (INS) that is aided by the external
GNSS (An external GNSS receiver is needed for high accuracy, the internal GNSS can
be used for low accuracy applications)

An inertial sensor block with three accelerometers and three angular rate sensors
is used 
to compute all the outputs. A WGS 84 modelled strapdown navigator algorithm 
compensates for earth curvature, rotation and Coriolis accelerations while measurements 
from the GNSS receiver update the position and velocity navigated by the inertial sensors.

This innovative approach gives the Inertial+ several distinct advantages over systems
that use GNSS alone:

All outputs remain available continuously during GNSS blackouts when, for
example, the vehicle drives under a bridge.
The Inertial+ recognises jumps in the GNSS position and ignores them.
The position and velocity measurements that the GNSS makes are smoothed to
reduce the high-frequency noise.
The Inertial+ makes many measurements that GNSS cannot make, for example
acceleration, angular rate, heading, pitch, roll, etc.
The Inertial+ takes inputs from a wheel speed odometer in order to improve the drift
rate when no GNSS is available.
The Inertial+ has a high (100 or 250 Hz) update rate and a wide bandwidth.
The outputs are available with very low, 3.5 ms latency.

The Inertial+ system processes the data in real-time. The real-time results are output via
RS232 and over 10/100 Base-T Ethernet using a UDP broadcast. Outputs are time-
stamped and refer to GPS time. The measurements are synchronised to the GPS clock.


Easy operation
Installation and operation of the Inertial+ could not be simpler. A simple configuration
wizard is used to configure the Inertial+. The configuration can be saved to the Inertial+
so it can operate autonomously without user intervention. A lot of work has been put into
the initialisation of the inertial algorithms so that the Inertial+ can reliably start to
navigate in the vast majority of situations. For example, the Inertial+ can initialize during
flight without problems.

To make installation easier, the Inertial+ contains its own, low-cost GNSS receiver. This
receiver is used to synchronise the inertial measurements to the external GNSS receiver.
Using this technique the Inertial+ is able to precisely time-align the measurements from
the external GNSS, giving much more accurate results.

The single unit contains the inertial sensors, low-cost GNSS receiver, data storage and
CPU. A laptop computer can be used to view the results in real-time. Often an antenna
splitter can be used to split the signal from the external GNSS receiver and feed it to the
GNSS receiver in the Inertial+.

Self-correcting
Unlike conventional inertial navigation systems, the Inertial+ uses GNSS to correct all
its measurements. GNSS makes measurements of position and velocity and (for dual
antenna systems) heading. Using these measurements the Inertial+ is able to keep other
quantities, such as roll, pitch and heading, accurate. Tight coupling of the GNSS and
inertial measurements means the raw GNSS data can also be used.

Flexible accuracy
The Inertial+ takes GNSS accuracy measurements into account and uses them to obtain
the best possible output accuracy. When using a 1 cm accurate GNSS receiver the
Inertial+ will give 1 cm accurate results. The Inertial+ can also be used without the need
for an external GNSS receiver and still provide an accurate navigation solution using its
own internal receivers.

Drop-in component
The Inertial+ has been made so that it is a “drop-in” component in many applications.
The NMEA input and NMEA output means that the original GNSS output can be
connected to the Inertial+ and the Inertial+ output can be connected to the final
application